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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
other factors which may have been present in the environment. in fact, we won't know with some certainty until the laboratoryratory completes its final review. revie away from the scene yesterdayerday afternoon the gttf began its investigation. immediately after theinve bombing the fbi initiate add a command coand post. those assigned to the jttf and other agent associated with jttf and many others on their own including boston, police, more than 1,000 law enforcement enfo across many agencies have beenn assigned to this investigationation via the command post. they began canvassing sources reviewing government and public source databases ask conducting condu interviews with eye wonses eyewitnesses toses determine who is responsible forresp this crime. we are doing this methodically,y, carefully yet with a sense of urgency. all across the nation and around the world the force of the united states is working hard to to locate those responsible.responsibl already the fbi has received more than 2000 tips as of noon ofoon today. many of which have already been reviewed analyzed
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
no, but the good thing is that we're actually in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not genericall
eliminate the other factors present in the environment. in fact, we wouldn't know with some certainty until the laboratory completes its final review. away from the scene yesterday afternoon, the jttf began its investigation. immediately after the bombing, the fbi initiated a command post. those assigned to the jttf intelligence analysts and other personnel from every state, local and federal government agency associated with jttf, and many others on their own's including boston pd and mass state police, more than a thousand law enforcement officers across many agencies have been assigned to this investigation via the command post. they began to canvass sources and conduct interviews with others to determine who was responsible for this crime. we are doing this methodically and carefully. all across the nation and around the world, the force of the united states is working hard to locate those responsible. already, the fbi has received more than 2,000 tips as of noon today, many of which have already been reviewed, analyzed and vetted. we will continue to work around the clock tirelessly si
something? >> well, again, in that environment, you can wear a hat, a hood, sunglasses. but this person is likely one minded. they wanted to get in, plant the devices and be gone. even though they may be trying to duck and hide from cameras that are on the wall, there will be cameras in banks, convenience stores and thousands of people with iphones and a devices taking pictures. that's why law enforcement is at airports, bus terminals, train stations, asking people if you have pictures, especially taken directly before the explosion. share those with law enforcement. the bomber's picture is there. we just have to pick it out among the thousands of pictures that exist. >> all right. thank you for your time. still ahead, another live report from boston on the ground where the investigation stands right now. plus, we have new video coming in of the bombing of the point of view of a runner. we'll show you that video. er ] s joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from bu
to protect your device from the environment. that's generally where they've been used. colombia, thailand, maybe even in pakistan. so it is kind of odd that they would use that here in a domestic setting. but, again, they don't know -- they don't have any suspect at all. >> it's also important to point out that this is an investigation where all of the resources and intelligence community are being used and they will have a backlog of intelligence they have to go through, intercept, satellite intelligence, signal intelligence, which they can monitor all of this stuff in realtime. >> they can't. and from what they monitor on a daily basis, minute-by-minute basis, from known suspects around the world, they had zero indication from this event. now you go back based on what happened and what you do know, you check cell phone towers and those international conversations and run your traffic through suspicious groups around the world. just speaking to the boston law enforcement source, a federal source earlier today, and a sense of is it domestic? is it international, the answer i got from both
of the environment that were involved in the blast. >> reporter: that same trauma surgeon saying some of the patients have to come back again and again for repeat operations. also saying that he has never seen anything, john, like the volume, the quantity of people that were rushed into his er immediately following this attack. >> that's what we keep hearing, poppy. the numbers were just staggering. so how prepared were they really for this flood of victims? >> reporter: you can say fortunately they were prepared. fortunately for a situation as they wished would never happen because they told us they prepare for things like this, massachusetts general, saying that within minutes after they got their first patient and after the attack they instituted an incident command system within five to ten minutes. they had enough surgeons. they even told us they had people flying back in, coming within hours back to the hospital from trips to try to help and do everything that they could. but they were prepared and they do have the hands needed at this point in time, john. >> you know, poppy, i did. i heard fro
. >> is it something that came from the environment or is it concentrated enough to make you lead you to believe they came from the bomb. >> i believe they came from the bomb but i can't be sure. >> how many amputations have you performed and how many are planned? >> if i have my numbers are right, we have performed four amputations and there are two more limbs that are at risk, but i hope that we will save those l legs. [ inaudible question ] yes, they are in intensive care. they are in critical condition. but at this point we have stabilized their vital signs and their hemodynamic situation is under control. >> what are their injuries, can you describe what has placed them in such critical condition? >> most of the injuries were, again, lower extremity major injuries. from these injuries they bled a lot. we controlled the bleeding rather rapidly, but certainly they lost a lot of blood and that created d physiologic problems. [ inaudible question ] as far as i know, all of them are americans. >> can you tell us an age range, doctor, of your patients? >> the younger patient so far was 28 years o
our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] ♪ i -- i got it ♪ i got it made, i got it made ♪ i got it made ♪ i got breakfast made fresh at subway® ♪ ♪ breakfast made the way i say [ male announcer ] at subway®, you got breakfast made. like a sunrise subway melt™ with chipotle southwest sauce. ♪ at subway® ♪ >> top stories we're following free on this tuesday april 16th, three people are dead including eight year old and 176 are hurt this morning after two bombs explode near the finish line of the bus boston marathon. president obama says those responsible will feel the full weight of justice. the fbi is taking charge of the criminal investigation. right now they say there is no motive and no one is in custody. meanwhile back in the bay area, security and law enforcement officials are stepping up patrols from the airports to public transportation. if you are out about today in the bay area expectancy added police officers everywhere. >> 7:42 a.m. and we will continue with the coverage of the boston marathon attacks. you're looking at a live shot there. back
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
is that they see the light. the leaves of the iris are constantly monitoring light environment. they're actually may sewering how long the night is. >> reporter: it has nothing to do with summer. it is all about recognizing... >> the length of the day and the length of the night. >> reporter: this blooming iris was captured in time lapse video by film maker lewis swarsberg. the images show case the wonder of these plants. which can detect and respond to light even color. >> just like we can see red, blue and green, plants can see red, blue and even u.v. light. >> reporter: in some ways plants have a greater spectrum of light. >> they see more than we do. from a plant's point of view we're visually challenged. we only have four or five photo receptors, proteins that can see the light in our bodies. plants have like 13. >> they don't have sense organs in the way that we do. they don't have eyes or ears or noses, but they have receptors. and that's the level at which humans and plants are the same. >> reporter: amy litt is the director of plant-gemomics at the botanical garden. she explains that so
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
, will probably be here working well past the year 2050 and probably, in today's environment, past the year 2060. our current retirement model is designed to give an employee a defined pension after a long career and it's a model that made a lot of sense in the 19 40's and 1950's but is not going to be appropriate for the 20 40's and the 20 50's. our world is becoming far so dynamic to make promises about pensions 40 and 50 years down the road. the benefit of a defined contribution system is that it gives employees options to consider. if job changes are possible, why hold people to benefits that they may not be able to use for 50 years? e're currently on a trajectory to hit about 400,000 career employees by the year 2017 and that's with all the changes we propose, the six to five day and the network changes as we shrink down. and after we reach that number, it's going to give us a pretty lean work force. we have a pretty lean work force right now from the standpoint of the network and the six-day delivery. but after that we will start hiring people. we estimate between 2017 and 2027, depending
the situation. the safety of everyone that ntue to dovethgo wils always ensure a safe environment for our fans." this notion ofpoing events, like the boston marathon, which hasad us loong at other viously, we have tonn marathon on sunday, officials there is a that they are paying close attention to their security preparations, we have also got some other races, i chke john. n ancisco marathon in ju, billy broadtreet run in may, indiana 500 festiva in may. lansing, michigan, in april, and raon inapl.cnt music obvisl ainwee talking about no credie threats, but officials in boston said no credible threats before tha o either, john. >>recautions are necesry important, and detandable the celticsamn boston, canceled. doesn't really matter. the playoffs just around the corner. that game will not be made up. shannon travis, our thanks to you. one other story about a sporting event which reallyauty attention overnight. fans of the oakland a's in oakland, tryg to rally fans to start instead of let's go a's chant, a let's go bostonchant. that just shows you how fans and right now.he city country are repu
whether this came from the environment, right? but it is not. >> i can tell you, as a person who has done trauma surgery, it can be difficult to tell sometimes when you're actually taking some of the shrapnel, wear exactly did it come from. but now they're saying without a doubt, we asked a few times, that there were nails, carpenter nails specifically and, quote, bb-like metal within some of these patients. and so they -- they know for sure it came from the explosive device. this is a doctor saying that based on their medical examination. this wasn't just debris that was lying around. >> what about also quickly in terms of the amputations, i was hearing one of the doctors saying last night, some of the patients were coming to them very injured, bleeding and saying, take whatever you need, i want to be alive. that has to be tough for a doctor, though. >> these are i think heart breaking decisions. it is a -- you can make the decision fairly quickly if that's going to be the best course of action. >> life or death. >> if you don't do the amputation, sometimes it can mean infection, that ca
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
chechnyans, correct? >> most of those aren't chechnyan. they come from a different environment for home-based operations. most of the people we company chur on the bale field coming be from the surrounding areas. >> there's a facebook page for dzhokhar tsarnaev. in any event, at least two sources who know him say that this is his twitter page, and on it he had, i think, over a dozen, 14 posts since the boston marathon bombings including this one on april 17th. i'm a stress-free kind of guy. i'm a stress-free kind of guy. then another one. another one saying, hold on, let me find it. yeah. okay. here it is. nowadays everybody want to talk like they got something to say but nothing comes out when they move their lips, just a bunch of jibberrish. i believe that's on his mind. i believe that's a quote of a song. days after authorities say he bombed the boston marathon, took the life of three innocent people and severely wounded or maimed nearly 200 of the citizens that he was living amongst. we are back in three minutes. as we wait to hear now from the suspect's father. plus we take another
is deeply troubling in an increasingly restrictive environment of civil liberties. this includes the measures with respect to registration as foreign agents and also restrictions on press and internet freedom. we made clear with human dialogue but we remain committed to open dialogue with civil seent supporting their efforts. >> i do a follow-up on that? >> sure. >> in the past -- i think the u.s. government has talked a lot about their concern of human rights abuse in chechnya. i'm wondering if you think the events in boston are going to change the way the government would see human rights in chechnya? >> with respect to the ongoing investigation in boston, i have to reiterate the secretary's comment that it would be highly norptse to make comments at this time. i can tell you this has been part of our human rights reporting on russia since 1995. you will find quite a bit of information on this year's report and they note serious human rights abuses taking place and human rights violations committed by authorities and militants. >> this is going to be the last question. >> you m
out. and the work that brady has just been doing in the context of this environment that just refuses to budge is astonishing. but i think you're right. the people have got to move in order to make accountable. >> but you raise something about the obama thing that has to be talked about. >> yes. my folks are like do not let michael speak! there is not enough time! we are not done. stay with us. aaah! aaaaah! theres a guy on the window! do something, dad! aaaah! aaaah! what is happening? they're rate suckers. their bad driving makes car insurance more expensive for the rest of us. good thing there's snapshot from progressive. snap it in and get a discount based on your good driving. stop paying for rate suckers. try snapshot free at progressive.com. u ush. >>> maybe you heard that a mississippi resident was arrested for sending ricin laced letters to the president and a republican senator. perhaps you heard about the explosion in a fertilizer plant that killed 14 people. but it was genuinely difficult to get news on anything other than boston this week. and here are a few of the things
something. if you see somebody carrying something odd that doesn't fit in the environment, you should seek out law enforcement and bring it to their attention. >> gretchen: you say to look at the people around you. even to the point of no problem staring at them. why? >> yes. as people, we don't like to look at people. anything more than two seconds, you're scary and being rude. you know what? be rude. pay attention to who is next to you. what are they wearing? how do they look? how are they carrying themselves? look at their behaviors. what are they communicating to you not just verbally, but nonverbally. >> gretchen: know where you will evacuate. oftentimes when people get on airplanes, they'll say i'm five rows from the nearest exit. you're talking about just in general, right? >> yes. whether indoors or outdoors. this specific event, you're barricaded in in an area. you're watching the marathon go on. when you get there, assess. if something happens, i want two ways out. if something happens on this side, i will go out this way. if something happens on this side, i will go out that way
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)